Academics

Preschool

NorthCreek Preschool provides children, ages 3 to 6 years, a Christian environment in which they can develop spiritually, emotionally, physically, mentally and socially through age appropriate activities. Our state licensed, high quality program offers a balance between child-initiated play and teacher directed activities. We recognize the crucial importance of children’s experiences during early childhood. Positive, supportive relationships during the earliest years are essential for healthy emotional development, cognitive development and social attachment. We believe that all areas of a child’s development – physical, social, emotional, spiritual and cognitive are interrelated and equal in importance, and that play is the best vehicle for discovery and growth.

Our programs encourage children to think independently, to experiment and to problem solve. Our curriculum is Bible based and emphasizes that God loves them, while helping them grown in their love for God, themselves and others. Through this curriculum, children are encouraged to develop healthy relationships and consideration and respect for others. Our curriculum also offers interest centers, introduction to phonics, language development and exercises to encourage small and gross motor skills.

The class offerings is listed below.

3s
Age requirements

Age 3 by October 31 and potty trained

Program distinctive
  • Developing friendships independent of parents
  • Taking turns
  • Following a routine
  • Sharing
  • Fine motor skill development through play and teacher directed activities
  • Gross motor skill development through outdoor play and circle time activities
  • Developing a love of learning and the joy of creative expression at school
Lunch Bunch

3s may extend their days until 1:30 PM with this enrichment program

Pre-Kindergarten
Age requirements

Age 4 by October 31

Program distinctive
  • Math skills: sequencing, size comparison, matching, sorting, patterning, counting
  • Language skills:  rhyming, opposites, positional words
  • Phonetic awareness:  zoo-phonics, letter sound and identification
  • Fine motor skills: cutting and writing with proper pencil grip
  • Gross motor skills:  eye-hand coordination, balance, pumping a swing
  • Self-help skills:  using the bathroom independently, putting away own items
  • Classroom skills:  following directions, taking turns, standing in line, transitioning
  • Social skills:  sharing, developing friendships, conflict resolution
  • Kindergarten preparation and developing a love for learning
Lunch Bunch

Pre-Kindergartners may extend their days Monday – Thursday until 2:30 PM with this enrichment program.

Junior Kindergarten
Age requirements

Age 5 by January 31

Program distinctive
  • Math skills: sequencing, size comparison, matching, sorting, patterning, one to one correspondence in counting, number awareness, and ordinal numbers
  • Language skills:  rhyming, opposites, positional words, story comprehension and the components of a story, pre-reading development
  • Phonetic awareness:  zoo-phonics, letter sounds and letter identification
  • Fine motor skills: cutting with correct scissors grip in a straight line and a zigzag line, writing with proper pencil grip including the child’s name with upper and lower case letters, ability to draw and identify shapes
  • Gross motor skills:  eye-hand coordination, balance, hopping on one foot, skipping, pumping a swing, bouncing and catching a ball
  • Social/Personal skills:  knows first and last name, parents’ names, address and telephone number, birthdate and age, taking responsibility for one’s own items, respecting peers as well as those in authority, ability to put on one’s own clothing and use the bathroom independently
  • Classroom skills:  following directions, taking turns, standing in line, transitioning
  • Social skills:  sharing, developing friendships, independent conflict resolution
  • Kindergarten preparation and developing a love for learning
Lunch Bunch

Junior Kindergartners may extend their days Monday – Thursday until 2:30 PM with this enrichment program.

ProgramDaysTimesLunch Bunch*
3sT/Th9:00-12:00T/Th 12:00-1:30
M/W/FM/W 12:00-1:30
Pre-Kindergarten (Pre-K)T/Th9:00-12:00T/Th 12:00-1:30
M/W/FM/W 12:00-1:30
or 12:00-2:30
M-FM/W 12:00-1:30
or 12:00-2:30
Junior Kindergarten (JK)M-Th9:00-12:00M-Th 12:00-2:30
M-FM-Th 12:00-2:30

Kindergarten

Elementary

Junior High

Classical Education

The Trivium

Our instruction will be utilizing methods from the Classical Education model.  The design of Classical Christian education is to produce a student with the mental discipline and ability to read an in-depth book, write discerning, thoughtful essays on the book, present lectures or debates on the contents of the book, and evaluate its contents in light of the Christian worldview.  Its goal is to teach the student to think clearly and express himself persuasively. To accomplish this, we will be teaching children according to three stages of learning and development: the Grammar, Dialectic, and Rhetoric stages. These stages make up what is known as the Trivium. The word Trivium comes from the Latin prefix Tri meaning “three,” and the Latin root “via” meaning the way. The word Trivium literally means three-way, referring to the three ways of learning that coincide with a child’s cognitive development as he or she matures.

  • Grammar Stage

    During this stage, children compile information in an organized framework (or “grammar”) for each subject area. Children love to chant, recite, and memorize. Emphasis on repetition and rote techniques corresponds to a child’s ability to easily memorize and learn by rote during this phase of development. During these elementary years, we are focused on the fundamental facts and rules of each subject, the building blocks, the “a,b,c’s” of each core subject including phonics, English grammar, spelling, reading of the classics, Bible study, math facts, and penmanship. This is the time to fill them full of facts, such as the multiplication table, geography, dates, events, plant and animal classifications – anything that lends itself to easy repetition and assimilation by the mind. The material is presented to the students in an assortment of techniques to reach all types of learning styles. Through the use of varied repetition, a strong foundation is laid as the building blocks for future learning.

  • Dialectic Stage

    During the second stage, the Dialectic stage, the child begins to understand that which he has learned and begins to use his reason to ask questions based on the information that he has gathered in the grammar stage. It is during this stage that the child no longer sees the facts that he learned as separate pieces of information, but he starts to put them together into logical relationships by asking questions. No longer can the American Revolution merely be a historical fact, but it must be understood in the light of the rest of what the child has learned. For example, how can one reconcile the fact that some of the founding fathers can be held up as great men even though they were also slaveholders? Through more in-depth and careful discussion and examination of evidence, the students learn how to question, how to dialogue, and how to discern. This leads to the development of stronger critical thinking skills. Formal logic is taught as a class. It is also integrated into each subject matter enabling students to learn the rules that guide sound thinking.

  • Rhetoric Stage

    With the grammar and dialectic stages serving as building blocks, children in this stage progress toward articulating their views. Children are learning how to think out loud; they become concerned with expressing themselves and how their ideas are coming across to others.

    Although our students will enter the Rhetoric stage after graduating from NorthCreek Academy, our educational goal is to prepare our students to enter these upper grades ready to learn how to 1) communicate clearly in written and verbal form, 2) thoroughly research all subject areas, 3) see interrelationships between subjects, 4) and apply a biblical worldview to daily living and future learning.

    By recognizing and utilizing these stages throughout the child’s development, we are cognizantly working with how God designed children, and their ability to learn.

Grade Level Distinctives

Bible

Bible is an integral part of the entire kindergarten curriculum as we strive to place God’s Word at the center of all that is taught. Each day begins with prayer, and principles from the Bible are part of our classroom studies, our social activities and our discipline. Our Bible curriculum encourages students to think biblically and to practice Christ-like values and character traits. We explore stories from Creation to Christ’s Resurrection. Kindergarteners participate in Bible memory verses which correlate to our weekly Chapel lessons.

Language Arts

Our kindergarten reading program is phonics- based with an emphasis on vocabulary development and beginning comprehension skills. Kindergartners learn letter names, sounds and how to blend sounds together to read words. Students develop a basic sight-word vocabulary, read short stories, and participate in oral reading and literature activities. The development of expressive language through oral language experiences is a highlight of our program. Our kindergartners experience rich literature and thematic units, including fun dress-up days. The literature is expanded through monthly author studies which include Laura Numeroff and H. A. Rey. Students are introduced to foundational writing skills, with instruction in basic punctuation, capitalization, and sentence structure. Training in sound-symbol relationships and developing spelling skills occurs in this foundational year. Correct letter formation and proper pencil grip are also established for strong writing habits.

History/Social Studies

Students begin the year learning about maps and globes, including oceans and continents. We “build” a neighborhood, complete with houses, to learn about community and transportation. Directions, including left and right; north, south, east and west are learned. Kindergartners also learn about the various holidays and why we celebrate them. We gain knowledge about our first and sixteenth presidents, George Washington and Abraham Lincoln, and we study many other great leaders while observing Black History. We study Ancient Egypt, the many changes that have occurred in history, and how they relate to us today. This study brings insight to our students about God’s sovereign role in history, as well as in today’s world. Biblical truths from God’s Word, as well as the book, The Story of the World are used in this study of ancient civilizations.

Math

Students are taught to recognize God’s order and design in Creation through numbers, shapes and patterns. At the kindergarten level, various hands-on activities are used to explore and understand each concept. Students learn about sorting, geometry, patterns, positions, numbers to 100, tables, graphs and fractions, addition and subtraction, money, time, measurement, place value with ones and tens and how to count by 2s, 5s and 10s.

Science

The science curriculum is interactive and inspiring for the students, giving them an opportunity to explore God’s world through many hands-on activities. We investigate various types of trees and leaves. The process of wood is followed as it travels from the tree to the factory, and into our lives. We learn about the creation of small animals by way of comparing and contrasting them, discovering their parts and learning how to handle God’s animals gently. Kindergarten students gain knowledge and appreciate the wonders of the amazing world God has given us.

Bible

First graders focus on the many gifts provided for us by God. Highlights of our Bible lessons include Creation, our families, friends, possessions, Jesus Christ and God’s care for us. Devotions, prayer, and scripture memorization are hallmarks of our daily routine. Biblical truths directly from God’s Word are interwoven throughout our curriculum. Christ-like values and character traits are emphasized in the classroom, as well as on the playground. Weekly chapel lessons, journal responses, and discussions help us grow in our understanding of the Lord.

Language Arts

Key elements of this program include rich literature, reading strategies, poetry appreciation, writing instruction and many opportunities to practice oral sharing in front of classmates. First graders will develop into fluent readers, phonetic and sight word spellers, and budding writers. Some of the books we explore together in class include Frog and Toad, Keep the Lights Burning Abby, Lily and Miss Liberty, and Coming to America. Book reports are introduced to encourage reading and a love for books. Training in D’Nealian handwriting is given for penmanship development that results in a strong foundation for cursive. This exciting academic year introduces Shurley English which uses rhythm, repetition and jingles to teach grammar concepts. Through a well-rounded, cross-curricular language arts program, students in first grade are given tools to help them reach their God-given potential and, to thrive.

History/Social Studies

Everyday life is contrasted and compared in different times and places around the world as we emphasize geographical connections on historical events using maps and relationships to the timeline. In first grade, we study Ancient Greece and Rome in order to recognize that while some aspects of people, places and things change over time, God remains the same. We identify valuable contributions made by these ancient civilizations that we continue to use today. In “HIS”-story, students learn that God has perfect plans for each of us as seen throughout the generations.

Math

To build a solid mathematical foundation, first grade math implements direct, systematic instruction, hands-on manipulatives and independent practice. We help students develop conceptual understanding, math competence, and confidence in numerical operations. Multiple strategies are used to develop number sense and problem solving. Students become budding mathematicians, as they investigate data, graphs, money, time, geometry, measurement, fractions and probability. Over the course of the year, addition and subtraction facts are memorized to 12, and doubles facts to 18.

Science

Science is a time of hands-on investigation and discovery. Our units include: Solids and Liquids, Air and Weather, and Plants and Animals. As they work together, students have the opportunity to explore and observe the world that God has created. Fascinating lessons both excite and train young, scientific minds to uncover God’s designs and students record these findings with illustrations. For students, highlights of the year include their discovering how things are made, at our annual “Take Apart Shop” and presenting their own inventions at the “First Grade Invention Convention.”

Bible

As we explore Finding God’s Promises in the Bible this year, second graders use the book of Exodus to study the life of Moses. In this study, the promises of God are evident, as the Israelites and their leader see both victory and tribulation as they learn to trust God. One theme of importance in our curriculum is encouraging our students to “conform to the image” of Jesus Christ (Romans 8:28). A strong emphasis is placed on character development, with lessons that encourage the students to make wise decisions for themselves.

Language Arts

Our program focuses on reading strategies, writing, and opportunities to share orally in front of the class to help them continue developing reading fluency and comprehension skills and Shurley English’s jingles and repetition makes learning grammer, sentence structure, and writing mechanics exciting. Formal spelling instruction continues, using patterns established in first grade and the eager second graders also begin learning formal cursive handwriting. Book reports introduce students to a variety of genres (fiction, biography, and fantasy). Throughout the year, we also integrate several core literature books in class which include: The One in the Middle is the Green Kangaroo, Flat Stanley, Molly’s Pilgrim, The Knight at Dawn, and The Courage of Sarah Noble.

History/Social Studies

We begin the year with our Family Ties unit, learning about family trees, traditions, and where our ancestors are from. We study Earth, Our Home, where students learn geography skills by studying maps, using a compass rose, and identifying the seven continents. Students also learn about the major forms of land and types of water found on earth. The Working World helps students learn about factories, flow charts and trading goods and, students learn more about People, Places and Holidays. In this unit, they study famous Americans and their contributions, historical and natural landmarks, and various holidays celebrated in the United States. During the second half of the year, we study the Middle Ages by travelling back to medieval Europe and Asia to learn about these different civilizations as we recognize that, while time changes, God is the same throughout all of our world’s history.

Math

Second grade mathematics continues to build-on and expand math concepts introduced in earlier grades. Through the use of hands-on manipulatives, students increase their knowledge of number sense, geometry, money and time, fractions and probability, measurement, and multiplication and division. Problem solving and critical thinking skills are practiced by the students as they learn to solve multi-step word problems. Students complete twice-weekly math fact drills, adding and subtracting numbers up to 18, with the goal of attaining memorization and ownership of these important math skills.

Science

Second grade science is an enjoyable year as students investigate, observe, record, and discover God’s creation. Intriguing and active lessons in our FOSS Curriculum are fascinating and engaging for the students, as they train their young minds to uncover God’s design, order and creativity. Our science units include: Pebbles, Sand and Silt, Balance and Motion, and Insects and Plants.

Bible

The third-grade Bible curriculum is designed to strengthen the students’ understanding of the Bible. This course includes biblical values that the students can apply to their own lives. We focus on the fruit of the Spirit and godly character traits. These values are learned through studying the lives of Abraham, Jacob, Joseph, and Daniel. Monthly Bible verses enhance our in-class curriculum, and correlate with our chapel program.

Language Arts

We continue to learn about grammar, sentence structure, and writing mechanics through Shurley English. Composing a correctly formatted paragraph with a topic sentence, supporting facts and details and a conclusion, is learned and applied through publishing several pieces including a “how-to” essay, a persuasive essay, a biography report, and an animal report. Along with practicing cursive, we develop reading comprehension, fluency, and vocabulary through our literature anthologies and spelling curriculum. Monthly book reports give students an opportunity to learn about different genres including biographies, historical and realistic fiction, and mysteries. Throughout the year, we read several core literature novels, which correspond to our curriculum. These books include Mr. Popper’s Penguins, The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, and Charlotte’s Web.

History/Social Studies

Students study communities past and present, along with a classically-based study of American history. This study, which spans from King James through the Lewis and Clark Expedition includes a Revolutionary War unit, in which great Americans including George Washington, William Penn and Benjamin Franklin are studied. Each January, students learn about Martin Luther King, Jr. and Rosa Parks. These studies set the foundation for more in-depth American History studies in fifth grade and junior high. In addition, students learn basic map reading skills including map parts such as compass rose, legend, map scale and titles. Field trips to Shadelands Ranch and the Ruth Bancroft Gardens allow students a chance to explore the people and places of our local history.

Math

The third-grade mathematics curriculum includes the information, skills and concepts required by California’s state standards. The curriculum encompasses place value, money and time, addition and subtraction, multiplication concepts, geometry and measurement, division concepts, data and probability, fractions, decimals, and multiplying and dividing greater numbers. Mastery of multiplication facts is a goal. Students practice problem solving and critical thinking skills through multi-step word problems.

Science

We are using the FOSS Curriculum, which enables us to get involved with many hands-on experiments! The curriculum covers foundations for understanding adaptations in physical structure or behavior. Students enjoy learning about plants and snails, but crayfish are our favorites. Experimenting with flashlights, mirrors and reflective light helps them learn about the relationship between energy, matter, and light that has a source. They also study the patterns and movements of the sun, moon, and stars. These studies help them learn not only about science, but also give them opportunities to understand more about our amazing Creator, as they see His order, logic, and creativity in units which include, Structures of Life, Matter and Energy, and Sun, Moon, and Stars.

Bible

As we seek to deepen our relationship with Jesus Christ and grow in our knowledge of Him, we dig into Scripture to see what God has to say. We study the life of Christ in the Gospels and learn about the Holy Spirit in the Gospels, Acts, and the Epistles. We end the year learning about the life of Paul and his missionary journeys through studying his Epistles and the book of Acts. Each week, we hide God’s Word in our hearts by memorizing and reciting scripture, which helps us walk in a manner that brings God glory.

Language Arts

Developing writing skills is a key component of our Language Arts program. Writing an essay about a California mission gives students an opportunity to focus on research, note-taking using key word outlines, forming paragraphs with topic sentences, supporting details, and clinchers. Creative writing is explored through Native American myths, first-person narratives, and poetry! For each writing assignment, students apply the grammar, sentence structure, and writing mechanics that they learn through the Shurley English program completing their final draft in cursive. Students also learn keyboarding and basic computer skills through various assignments, including a PowerPoint presentation on a missionary. Reading comprehension, fluency, and vocabulary are developed using our literature anthologies and spelling curriculum. Students learn about different genres including biography, fantasy, historical and realistic fiction, mystery, and more, through monthly book reports. We also read several core literature novels in class, which correspond to our history curriculum. These include: Island of the Blue Dolphins, Little House in the Big Woods, By the Great Horn Spoon!, Patty Reed’s Doll, and Sarah, Plain and Tall.

History/Social Studies

In social studies, we explore and discover our home state of California, as well as learning how it fits into the big picture of the United States. As we learn more about California’s history and geography, we are better able to understand the state we live in, how it came to be a part of the United States, and how it continues to grow. In addition, we get to see some of the sights for ourselves through trips to John Muir’s Martinez Home and Muir Woods, Mission San Francisco de Solano, Old Sacramento and the Railroad Museum, Sutter’s Fort and the Capitol, as well as Columbia State Historic Park!

Math

Fourth-grade math is a time to pull together the basics we have already learned and to build on this foundation. Over the course of the year, we master our multiplication facts, tackle double-digit multiplication, and become experts in long division! Students also acquire many problem-solving strategies such as making tables/lists, using logical reasoning, working backward, using diagrams and graphs, finding patterns, and more. In addition, we begin to work with geometry, decimals, fractions, and yes, even algebra, and we learn why these skills are important.

Science

Fourth-grade science is an exciting time of investigation and discovery. Students conduct hands-on experiments, while making predictions and observations, and thinking critically about the way the world around them works. This helps them to learn about our amazing Creator, and to see His order, logic, and creativity as they study units on Solid Earth, Magnetism and Electricity, and Environments.

Bible

Fifth graders survey the Old Testament with the purpose of using various study methods to glean its truths and to apply these truths to their own lives. The goal this year is for the students to have a more in-depth, personal study of Scripture. Our Bible curriculum allows students to practice what they learn with real life scenarios using role playing and discussions. As part of these studies, students create special-focus projects for Christmas and Easter, including writing their own devotions to share with their families.

Language Arts

Developing effective writing skills and competent oral communication are key components of our fifth-grade language arts program. While we continue to learn about grammar, sentence structure, and other writing mechanics through using Shurley English, a major focus this year is in writing thoughtful responses to the reading. Students continue to practice their researching, note-taking and composition skills, culminating in their state report and monthly book reports. In language arts, students develop their reading comprehension, fluency, and vocabulary through the use of literature anthologies. Core literature novels fifth graders read include, Call it Courage, Across Five Aprils, Sign of the Beaver, The Lion, Witch and the Wardrobe, The Bronze Bow, Number the Stars, and Clay Marble. As part of their language arts work, fifth graders continue to practice their keyboarding skills.

History/Social Studies

Fifth grade history begins with a review of geography and a quick overview of Native American cultures. This is followed by a chronological study of exploration, colonization, the fight for independence, westward expansion, and immigration. Students will complete chapter reviews and produce chapter summaries to chronicle main ideas. Weekly geography packets reinforce prior learning and introduce new facts and concepts through the use of world maps and legends. Included worksheets afford students the opportunity to practice map skills. There will be special projects and days related to the following studies: Colonial Life, The Civil War, and The States.

Math

In fifth grade, the concepts of fractions and decimals will be further developed, and students will use all four operations with these number types. There will also be an increased emphasis on algebraic thinking. Other topics that are studied include: statistics, geometry, measurement, probability, percents, and proportions. Special attention is given to critical thinking, problem solving, and mental math. Your fifth grader will not only learn to value math, but will also become a confident problem solver and learn to reason and communicate mathematically as well.

Science

FOSS (Full Option Science System) utilizes a strong, hands-on approach to the world of science. Fifth grade science units include: Living Systems, The Water Planet, and Mixtures & Solutions. Each FOSS unit is composed of numerous investigations, complete with a variety of science labs which are constructed in a small learning group environment. Throughout their study of science, the students investigate the world around them as they deepen their understanding of God’s creation. During the school year, students also participate in special activities including field trips and a weather station project. These activities are designed to expand their understanding of the fifth-grade science curriculum.

Bible

Sixth-grade Bible uses the Fundamentals of the Faith workbook by Dr. John MacArthur. This is essentially a systematic theology curriculum designed to walk students through thirteen areas of theology, using the Scriptures as its basis. In sixth grade, we cover the first three areas of the study, which include a Bible history survey, a study of the various biblical genres, a unit on the process of inductive Bible study, and an examination of the character and attributes of God.

Language Arts

Within the classical model of education, sixth-grade is a transition year, as students move into the Dialectic Stage, learning to think more critically and to engage in higher-level reasoning. This is especially true in language arts, which uses the core literature of sixth grade to give them an opportunity to learn to analyze, evaluate, respond and write about the various themes and elements of literature. As part of this in-depth reading, students read The Hobbit, Tales of O. Henry, and Treasure Island. Julius Caesar is read as part of a Shakespearean appreciation unit. Along with in-class literature, students complete independent reading from the Junior High Classics Reading List, as well as free reading. During the course of the year, students complete a variety of writings, including creative, extemporaneous, informative, and persuasive, each addressing a variety of topics and styles. Vocabulary Workshop Level A, by Sadlier-Oxford provides in-depth, quality vocabulary development. This comprehensive grammar curriculum hones the skills learned in elementary school, and helps students transition into high school with confidence. In all aspects of sixth-grade course work, students are directed to consider God’s Word and how it pertains to the topics, situations, or worldviews presented in the curriculum.

History/Social Studies

The focus of sixth-grade history and social studies is Ancient Civilizations, in which students examine the earliest influential societies and empires from approximately 4,000 B.C. to approximately 500 A.D., including, Mesopotamia, Egypt, Israel, China, India, Greece and Rome. As students make the transition from elementary to middle school, history/social studies is a particularly strong area for skill development in critical thinking and analysis and in integration with other subjects (i.e. language arts and science), skills developed through reinforcing cultural literacy via stories, note-taking, hands-on art projects and re-enactments. This comes through students reading increasingly sophisticated literature as supplementary material, conducting highly animated debate-style, in-class discussions and, most of all through discerning research and correlation with scripture. Old and New Testament historical accounts are consistently brought to bear as the linchpin for understanding and retaining the material. Testing modalities emphasize personal ownership and analysis of material beyond rote memorization. Connections to the modern day are also featured.

Math

In sixth-grade math, basic computation skills students have been learning over the last few years are reinforced, with the goal of applying these skills to real-life situations. Students learn about integers, decimals, fractions, ratios, proportions, percents, and statistics. Some basic algebra concepts are introduced, and problems are examined from a more algebraic frame of reference. As part of reviewing and reinforcing concepts already learned, students use manipulatives and other math tools. Also, this year, students delve into more complex operations within multiplication and division.

Science

In earth science, we begin with a firm scriptural foundation, cementing the knowledge that God has control over all the earth and its creation. As we delve into the various areas of earth science, students are involved in critical thinking skills, hands-on labs, and preparation for our Junior High Science Fair. Throughout the school year, students investigate the earth’s systems and cycles, its composition and energy resources, along with studying earthquakes and volcanoes.

Health

Health is an area that allows students to learn about their God-given bodies. During the course year, as part of caring for their bodies, students learn about the dangers of tobacco, drugs and alcohol, along with how to practice good hygiene and how to make good food choices. They learn about common illnesses, how to develop a personal fitness plan and how to set goals for themselves. Learning basic first aid and how to take care of simple injuries is important, whether students are caring for themselves, or babysitting others. And, as part of our health education, we also teach graded, gender-centric workshops on sexual education. This program is designed so that, while these topics are being covered with students, a separate parent class is available for those want to know more about what is taught. It is our heartfelt desire that parents take an active role in their student’s learning in this vital area, as well as in answering questions at home and continuing to talk more more in-depth about these topics, if their student is ready.

Computers

This course focuses on preparing students to be confident, successful computer users during their junior high and high school years. Each week, students are challenged with meeting minimum typing speed and accuracy requirements. As part of the course, students are given a GSuite for Education account with which they learn how to complete assignments and tests electronically. In GSuite, file organization is learned through Google Drive, class management in Google Classroom, word processing in Google Docs, spreadsheets in Google Sheets and presentations in Google Slides. An additional, important focus of this course is teaching students to safely use the internet and how to understand their computer history. These skills are taught along with other basic computer processes.

Bible

This year, we continue work in our Fundamentals of the Faith workbook by Dr. John MacArthur. This is essentially a systematic theology curriculum that walks students through 13 areas of theology using the Scriptures as its basis. This study begins with an in-depth look at the person and work of Christ and continues with topics such as the Holy Spirit, prayer, spiritual gifts, obedience, evangelism and guidance. In all aspects of seventh-grade course work, students are directed to consider God’s Word and how it pertains to the topics, situations or worldviews presented in the curriculum, and to make spiritual/biblical applications wherever possible.

Language Arts

As they continue in the Dialectic Stage of the classical model of education, students’ critical thinking skills and higher-level reasoning are honed through writing analyses, evaluations, and responses to the various themes and elements of the seventh-grade core literature which includes a Short Story Collection by Classic Authors, A Christmas Carol by Dickens, Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry by Taylor, Hind’s Feet on High Places by Hurnard, and Macbeth by Shakespeare. Independent reading from the Junior High Classics Reading List is completed, along with free reading. Students are involved in a variety of writing experiences addressing different topics and writing styles including persuasive/ argumentative, expository and creative. As part of their studies, students continue working in Vocabulary Workshop Level B by Sadlier-Oxford, as this comprehensive grammar curriculum will help them transition into high school.

History/Social Studies

Students explore God’s unfolding narrative as it spans from Rome’s downfall to 18th century Europe. Through a combination of reading material, ethnic food days, museum trips, and films, students enjoy vicarious visits to almost every continent. In the midst of these delights, we must also taste some bitterness, as we learn what happens when God’s image-bearers, created for eternity, instead live under the curse of sin and mortality. History is littered with conflicts, oppression, and war. Ultimately, however, through our study of empires and civilizations, students will see the pre-eminence of God’s grace, and will behold in different cultures, the progression of the eclectic expression of all that which was seeded in Adam and Eve. As part of our study of American history, during either their seventh or eighth grade year, students have the opportunity to visit Washington D.C. with NorthCreek.

Math

In seventh grade math, we continue to solidify basic arithmetic skills including working with integers, fractions, decimals and percents. We also spend some time in the geometry world, learning about angles, polygons and circles and finding the perimeter, area, surface area and volume of two- and three- dimensional figures. We also expand our knowledge of algebra by solving equations and inequalities, as well as applying those concepts and skills to problem solving situations.

Science

As part of an exciting year in life science and as part of cementing our foundation, we begin our studies by looking at God’s Word, before moving on to learn about cells, DNA, heredity, light, plants and animals. Seventh graders extract DNA, learn about heredity, make a 3-D cell model, debate the issue of evolution, and dissect various organs, plants and animals, all as part of learning more about the world that God has created. Students are involved in various labs, discussion times, group and independent activities as well as being a part of NorthCreek Academy’s science fair. The science fair often leads to our students participating in the County Science Fair, which is held in the spring. Every other fall, our seventh and eighth graders head to Mt. Hermon for a week of science, as part of Outdoor Science School.

Logic

Informal logic is another way seventh graders work on their thinking skills. Studying logic is a vital component of the Dialectic Stage of the classical model of education, providing students with an opportunity to learn the rules by which we reason. This also builds on their abilities to discern truth from error, and gives them tools to able to defend their faith. We learn about 28 separate fallacies— bad arguments— giving us insight into how one should not defend a position. Students discuss these in class and create a booklet defining and illustrating each of these common fallacies. Studying logic helps students to sharpen their own reasoning skills and to be more discerning when reading or listening to arguments and opinions that surround them via the media and the people in their lives.

Health

In keeping with our desire to cultivate our students’ hearts and minds in Christ, we host annual sessions on sex education, drug and alcohol awareness, and internet safety for our junior high students.

Bible

In eighth-grade Bible, we study the concept of worldview using, Your Word is Truth, from Desiring God Ministries. As part of using this curriculum, various areas of life and cultural issues are examined through the lens of Scripture. Students study relevant Bible passages in order to discern the truth about topics such as the nature of truth, the origin of the world, the environment, biblical manhood and womanhood, marriage, work, entertainment, money and more! The goal is for students to rightly interpret the truth of God’s Word for themselves and to see all of life in light of that truth.

Language Arts

The Dialectic Stage in language arts is a time when students are “digging deeper” into the material, using critical thinking. Faith is integrated with learning, and students are encouraged to be good stewards of their God-given gifts and talents. Core literature, including: The Miracle Worker, Johnny Tremain, The Hiding Place, and The Screwtape Letters, are read by the students and, at the end of the year, they read the unabridged version of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, as part of preparing and performing a student-led production of the play. Literature is discussed in a variety of ways, including dialectical journals, short answer essays, fishbowl discussions, and debate. As the eighth graders prepare for high school, they will receive experience in writing which includes persuasive/argumentative writing, expository writing, and response to literature writing. Vocabulary is taught both through literature, and through Vocabulary Workshop Level C by Sadlier-Oxford. Lessons are reinforced through daily usage, oral presentations, and creative writing, as well as through weekly assessments. Grammar usage continues to be stressed in their writing, aiding them in their transition to high school. Students are expected to apply what they have learned, by using correct punctuation, spelling, vocabulary, and grammar in their writing.

History/Social Studies

In eighth-grade history and social studies, our focus is on the United States, from its earliest colonial roots in the 1600s, through its place on the world-stage of WWII, along with forays into current events. A sampling of aspects of the study of the U.S. includes: founding, expansion, civics and government, economics, leaders, wars, demographics and burgeoning cultural identity. An appreciation for, and an increasing involvement in U.S. citizenship, is a recurring and underlying theme for the year. This includes frequent and sustained references to Christianity being the foundation and source of any– and all– successes our nation, its citizens and its leaders have experienced! Students use their established knowledge and skills in research, oral participation, expressive written work, hands-on projects and role-playing. These studies, which integrate literature and science, prepare our students for success in high school history, and for active and informed participation in our country’s governance in the future. During either their seventh- or eighth-grade year, students have the opportunity to visit Washington D.C.

Math

During eighth grade, students learn the concepts and skills of an Algebra 1 course, including the solving of equations, inequalities and systems, along with multiplying and factoring polynomials, and graphing and writing equations of lines and other functions. The focus this year, is on critical thinking, persevering in problem solving, and learning to find and generalize patterns. These skills prepare students for the rigors of high school mathematics.

Science

Eighth-grade science is the study of physical science, which involves learning about the patterns, order and predictability of the universe that God created. It involves looking at matter and its structure, as students learn about atoms, chemistry, motion, and forces. Each week, students participate in inquiry-based, hands-on lab activities. They complete a unit on the Universe, to learn about the heavens and how they “declare the glory of God.” As part of building-on their knowledge of the various laws and concepts they have learned, students create a day-long “Exploratorium” that the entire school to participates in and enjoys. The students build catapults, design roller coasters, set-up race tracks, race dominoes and observe the heavens. By participating in our Junior High Science Fair, students have another opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned, and some students choose to enter their projects in the County Science Fair. Every other fall, our seventh and eighth graders head to Mt. Hermon for a week of fun and science at Outdoor Science Camp.

Logic

In eighth-grade logic, as part of the Dialectic Stage of classical education, students learn to defend their faith in a reasonable and rational way. We move from approaches to avoid in defending our positions, to learning techniques that will help us to support and defend our faith. We start with the common topics of definitions, testimony, comparison, relationship, and circumstance. This information benefits our students in their other subjects and assignments as they are able to use these techniques to support a thesis, or to improve a science fair hypothesis or as a foundation for building better arguments in debate. After learning how to build and defend arguments, the students progress to studying formal logic, where they learn how to construct three-statement syllogisms and how to determine whether their syllogisms are valid. The fundamental reason logic is taught is to help students learn to think critically.

Health

In keeping with our desire to cultivate our students’ hearts and minds in Christ, we host annual sessions on sex education, drug and alcohol awareness, and internet safety for our junior high students.

Enrichment Programs

Art

The first book of the Bible, Genesis, makes it clear that God, the author and creator of life, made us in His image and our creativity is a natural reflection of this. Michelangelo said, “A true work of art is but a shadow of the divine perfection.” In art, students have the chance to go on an adventure through time as they learn about some of the great masters of art, their lives and the art they created. While studying these artists, students further engage with the artist through creating an art piece reflective of the artist’s style. Each year, five-to-six artists are studied in a rotating cycle so that by the time a student reaches the sixth grade, they will have studied at least 30 different artists. In addition to studying the masters, there is a “classroom connection” component designed to enhance the classroom curriculum.

Latin

As a classically-based school, we seek to enrich our students’ lives through teaching Latin. The Bible teaches that there is no language where God’s glory is not heard.

“The heavens declare the glory of God, and the firmament shows his handiwork. Day unto day utters speech, and night unto night reveals knowledge. There is no speech nor language, where their voice is not heard.” (Psalm 19:1-6)

Latin is a foundational language for a classical education. Studying Latin allows students to see God’s order in its nuances and structure. As they build their foundation of vocabulary, grammar and Latin derivatives, students also build on their knowledge of classical Roman history.

Latin is taught through its grammatical rules and, as a student’s understanding of Latin grows, so does an understanding of the mechanics and structures of language as a whole. Dissecting sentences to discern their meaning imparts skills helpful with algebra and computer coding. As 60% of English vocabulary is Latin- based, this also provides a rich means of understanding our language. Latin is the language of science and law, and it is the foundation for the romance languages including Spanish, French and Italian. The mind of the student that has been educated in Latin takes on the qualities of Latin: logic, order, discipline, structure. Latin requires, and teaches attention to detail, which extend into the study of other subjects. As Latin is a foundational subject, students who are new to NorthCreek Academy are encouraged to attend our summer workshop introducing Latin fundamentals.

Music

NorthCreek Academy seeks to enrich the lives of our students with music. The Bible teaches that music can be used for praise and worship (Psalm 33:2-3), and we treasure putting this into practice. We believe that music is part of God’s Creation and with it, we bring glory to our Creator. Music can be used to encourage and build others up in the body of Christ (Ephesians 5:18-19).

Physical Education

Believing that it is our responsibility to honor God in all that we do, and that our bodies are “a temple to the Holy Spirit” (1 Corinthians 6:19), students are taught that fueling their bodies with healthy food and keeping their bodies strong through regular exercise is honoring to God. At NorthCreek Academy, physical education is more than just playing games. It is also a chance for students to learn how to deal with conflict and to forgive others. It is an opportunity for students to learn how to lift-up less confident players. The skills learned in physical education are just one more part of their growing in knowledge of how to honor God in all aspects of their lives.

Learning Assistance Program

NorthCreek Academy offers a Learning Assistance Program for students who are experiencing difficulty in classroom achievement. Students can be referred for consideration in the program through a classroom teacher, the principal, or by his/her parents with the agreement of the teacher and principal. Students are given several assessments in order to determine learning strengths and weaknesses, and to develop an appropriate educational program that would best meet identified needs. Based on the assessment, recommendations are made, which may include individual remediation, classroom accommodations, and referrals for additional testing/support by other professionals.

Students who are referred to the LAP for remediation meet with a learning specialist in individual sessions one to three hours per week.

These sessions are based on individual student needs and focus on developing foundational academic skills, strengthening processing skills and improving compensatory skills for classroom success.

For our younger students, NCA offers the Search and Teach program. The purpose of this program is to find and assist students who may have difficulty with skills basic to reading and the language arts. All kindergarten students are assessed with the SEARCH screening tool in September. Those who would benefit from individual instruction in preacademic and beginning academic skills meet with an instructor in individual TEACH sessions thirty to sixty minutes per week.

Next Steps

We hope you prayerfully consider NorthCreek and encourage you to take the proper steps in applying for our school.